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Kids, Codes and Computer

Our computers dont read the letter A like we read the letter A. The computer has a special code called thebinary alphabet. Binary numbers, based on 1s and 0s, reflect the practical essence of computer hardware: electricity is either on or off. Learn how to write in binary numbers, and the (not so secret) code to transform English language letters into binary numbers and back again.

When is the letter A not the letter A? Well, computers don’t use the letter A. They use the eight character binary number 01000001 to represent A. This binary numbers tutorial describes what binary numbers are and how to calculate them.

Computers transport, calculate, and translate binary numbers because computer hardware circuits only have two electrical states, on or off. These two states can be represented as zero (off) or one (on). All letters of the alphabet, numbers, and symbols are converted to eight character binary numbers as you work with them in software on your computer.

How to Create Binary Numbers

Binary numbers are eight characters in length where every character is either a 1 or 0. The placement of each 1 indicates the value of that position, which is used to calculate the total value of the binary number. Each position of each of the eight characters represents a fixed number value, as shown below.

Let’s Convert a Letter to a Binary Number

So for ease to use here is a table that represent the alphabets and the binary numbers of it.

And by using the tables we can start creating a code for some sentences. For examples if we want to convert CAT into binary then we will convert each letter.

C = 1000011

A = 1000001

T = 1010100

So the code for CAT is 1000011 1000001 1010100. Now that you understand how to code, lets make it more fun by applying with LEGO. We can represent the binary numbers with:

1 = White

0 = Blue

Good luck parents with trying the new code and language, you can even use this as a secret language with the kids. Were sure they all gone love this a lot.

 

*Images and materials credits to www.littlebinsforlittlehands.com andwww.kidscodecs.com